About Human Trafficking

VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING ARE:

  • Exploited for economic gain
  • Under the constant threat of violence
  • Completely controlled by their traffickers


HUMAN TRAFFICKING BY THE NUMBERS

  • Women and children make up 88% of the victims.
  • Approximately 79% of the victims are subjected to sexual exploitation. 18% are forced laborers, though this number may be less accurate because so many victims of forced labor go undetected.
  • An estimated 600 to 800 thousand individuals are trafficked across international borders annually, with up to 17.5 thousand of those victims being trafficked into the United States each year.
  • Human trafficking is the fastest growing criminal industry worldwide and the world’s third largest criminal industry—valued at nearly $32 billion annually—behind only the illegal drug and arms trades.


GET INFORMED & INVOLVED

Visit our Resources and STOP TRAFFICK pages to learn ways you can get involved in the fight against Human Trafficking.

Human Trafficking is modern day slavery. Human Trafficking is today’s most widespread human rights violation and crime against humanity. Often, the issue of Human Trafficking is tied to the broader issues of poverty, crime, and corruption, and it disproportionately affects woman and children.

THEY CANNOT WALK AWAY.

You can find these victims almost everywhere in the world: in brothels, factories, farms, restaurants, and even private residences.

Many people are shocked to learn that this problem exists in today’s prosperous and globalized world, but awareness of the issue is growing and there are also a growing number of grassroots organizations that make it easy to get educated and involved in the fight against trafficking.

WHY CAMBODIA?

Cambodia has the highest incidence of sexual exploitation of women and children in the world.

The combination of widespread poverty and almost non-existent state support systems make the nation’s women and children easy targets for traffickers. After witnessing the desperate situation in Cambodia, it became clear that offering a viable source of income to Cambodian women was likely the best way that we could help to break the cycle of human trafficking.